Relationships between Parents and Child

Planning Family Time and Activities

Q. I came from a broken home; I do not know how to build a strong relationship with my child. What should I do?

A. Read Proverbs 22:6; 1 Corinthians 13:13; Ephesians 6:4; Colossians 3:21.

Read pages 49–52: Chanley, Michael. Collaborate: Family+Church. Louisville, KY: Ministers Label Publishers, 2010.

Q. How can I use the time I spend with my children to strengthen them spiritually?

A. Read Deuteronomy 6:4–7; Joshua 24:15; Proverbs 22:6; 1 Corinthians 10:31.

Read pages 128–144: Bruner, Kurt and Steve Stroope. It Starts at Home. Chicago: Moody Publishers, 2010.

Q. We used to have family time when my child was little, but these days both of us are too busy. Does my teenager still need my help?

Read Deuteronomy 6:4–7; Psalms 127:3; Proverbs 13:22.

Read pages 48–64: Hemphill, Ken and Richard Ross. Parenting with Kingdom Purpose. Nashville: B&H, 2005.

Using Positive Words and Encouragement

Q. When my child does something wrong, I try to talk with him/her. However, the conversation usually turns into an argument, and sometimes we cannot control our anger. What should I do?

A. Read Ephesians 4:29; 6:4; James 1:20.

Read pages 94–110: Burns, Jim. Teenology: The Art of Raising Great Teenagers. Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2010.

Q. What my child wants to do is not what I want him to do. I just want the best life for him. Why should I encourage my child to keep on the right path?

A. Read Psalms 127:3; Ephesians 6:4; Colossians 3:21; Philippians 2:1–4.

Read pages 100–4: Burns, Jim. Teenology: The Art of Raising Great Teenagers. Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2010.

Q. I know communication is important to build up a good relationship with my child, but it feels like we have no common ground. Where do we start to build a relationship?

A. Read Psalms 127:3–5; 1 Timothy 5:8; 1 Corinthians 13:13; Titus 2:7.

Read pages 65–73: Hemphill, Ken and Richard Ross. Parenting with Kingdom Purpose. Nashville: B&Holman, 2005

Showing Respect and Trust

Q. My teenager seems too dependent on me for his age. Is it wrong to help him whenever he needs me?

A. Read Proverbs 13:24; 22:6; 29:15; Hebrews 12:11.

Read pages 39–46: Burns, Jim. Teenology: The Art of Raising Great Teenagers. Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2010.

Q. How do I help my teenager transition to a young adult?

A. Read Ephesians 2:10; Deuteronomy 32:46; Proverbs 22:6; Ephesians 6:4.

Read pages 114–31: Elmore, Tim. Artificial Maturity: Helping Kids Meet the Challenge of Becoming Authentic Adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2012.

Q. I want my children to have a strong relationship with God. How is my relationship with them affecting their faith and spiritual growth?

A. Read Matthew 5:13–16, 48; Luke 6:43–44; 1 Timothy 4:12.

Read pages 86–100: Bruner, Kurt and Steve Stroope. It Starts at Home. Chicago: Moody Publishers, 2010.

Understanding Your Teen’s World

Q. How can I discuss romantic relationships with my teen?

A. Read Proverbs 5; [the whole chapter?] 1 Corinthians 6:9, 18–20; Colossians 3:1–25.

Read chapter 8: Mueller, Walt. Youth Culture 101. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2007.

Q. I think my child is spending too much time on the Internet or with friends. I want her to have fun and enjoy herself, but the amount of time seems out of balance. How do I express my concern without pushing her away?

A. Read Psalms 1:1–3; Ephesians 6:4; 1 Corinthians 10:31; Colossians 3:17.

Read pages 60–78: Burns, Jim. Teenology: The Art of Raising Great Teenagers. Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2010.

Q. My child has some friends I don't know well. I don't know if these friends will pressure my teenager into a bad situation. How do I protect my child if the pressures are too great?

A. Read Proverbs 13:20; 18:24; Ecclesiastes 4:9–12; John 15:13.

Read chapter 7: Mueller, Walt. Youth Culture 101. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2007.